No Matter How You Feel… Show up and Never Give up

Today’s the fifth day of the 12-Week Challenge. I missed a day on Wednesday as I had to travel to the city for work, which means almost four hours back and forth. On Thursday, I picked up the challenge again by jumping rope on my roof.

Jumping-Rope

I made around 120 rounds… not that much if you think of the little time needed to do that, but still, it was better than nothing and my heart rate certainly went up a notch. It’s amazing how a simple exercise was able to lift my mood as well—I was feeling rather depressed about my economic situation after paying tax, and worried how I’m going to pay the rent, let alone my ballet classes! (If you are so inclined, please consider sending in a donation so I can keep on taking ballet class… click here. I’ll be forever grateful!)

The Universe does have its way of comforting and encouraging me. First, I saw this quote while browsing Instagram:

“No matter how you feel, get up, dress up, show up and never give up.”
~Regina Brett

It was like a gentle nudge that life goes on, keep doing what you need to do and what you love to do.

Then, another sign—The following cardio workout routine showed up on my Facebook newsfeed. Exactly what I needed to get my cardio exercise done for the challenge:

The trainer, Jenna Wolfe, said the exercises progress from the easiest to the hardest, from the largest number of reps to the smallest. To my surprise, I almost stopped dead in the middle of the sequence. The squatting one was so tough. My thighs were killing me. But the high kicks were easy, without me having to bend the trunk forward like Wolfe does in the video (dancer’s advantage, I guess). I don’t know if I burned 100 calories or not (the goal of this workout) but I don’t care about calories. It’s the heart rate that matters, and I surely could feel the blood pumping fast after the workout!

Then, somehow I stumbled upon the following video on workout exercises. Although I was going to try out Kathryn Morgan’s leg workout, my attention turned to this instead. In my first time back at the ballet studio, I noticed how tight my hip muscles were and how little turnout was left of me, so I decided to work on that. Check out this video! I love it because all the exercises were done with a focus on warming up and rotating the hip joint… no forcing at all. And the video is not too long, around 8 minutes. You can do it along with the instructor Lisa Maree. Some of her audience members reported much better turnout after having done this workout repeatedly. So it might be something to build into the 12-week challenge routine and beyond.

After my workouts were done, my legs were totally shaky! But I feel good. The quote above is so spot on! Thank you, Universe.

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Anna Pavlova and Turned-in Legs

Anna Pavlova

Ballet dancers have this obsession about turnout… or worse, that “perfect” 180-degree turnout that is so elusive and unattainable for most of us. But has anybody ever noticed how turned in the legendary Anna Pavlova was? And none of that diminished her artistry and dramatic appeal by even a tiny bit. Just read this passage which describes how Rudolph Nureyev liked the turned-in aesthetics:

“Rudolph has always admired the beauty of Merle [Park]’s legs — slim and turned in like Pavlova’s, with the same highly arched insteps…” (“Rudolph Nureyev, The Life” by Julie Kavanagh, Penguin 2007).

In the following video, you will be able to see some rare footage of Pavlova dancing solos. Listen to what the program host, Margot Fonteyn, said about Pavlova’s dancing: “Pavlova disregarded pure ballet technique. When it suited her it was only because she was interested in being expressive. Virtuosity had no purpose unless it served the purpose of dance. And yet at the same time, she had the speed and strength which would be hard to equal today.”

Cheers to turned-in legs and expressive dancing!