ABT’s Whipped Cream and David Hallberg’s Comeback on the New York Stage

"Whipped Cream" by American Ballet Theatre, curtain call, May 22, 2017 - Balletomanehk.com

What a festive evening at the Metropolitan Opera! The American Ballet Theatre opened its Spring season with Alexei Ratmansky’s “Whipped Cream.” Everything about this ballet is sweet… a big crowd pleaser for sure—especially popular among kids but no one can … Continue reading

Giselle… Love’s Eternal Tragedy

Giselle

Two nights ago I attended a performance of Giselle at the Hong Kong Cultural Centre. It was part of the 42nd Hong Kong Arts Festival. The touring company was Milan’s La Scala Theatre Ballet and the leading roles were danced by Svetlana Zakharova and David Hallberg, two of the world’s top dancers today.

Act I was delightful in the beginning and absolutely captivating at the end thanks to the marvelous performance of Zakharova and Hallberg, but the peasant dances made me yawn and wish I had a remote control to fast forward to where the two stars would appear again!

While Zakharova’s slim, tall and bony physique and generally cool facial expressions may not lend herself to be that perfect sweet peasant girl, I was quite satisfied about her role-play. She did manage to convince me of being an innocent, happy-go-lucky girl who experienced love for the first time. Her super archy feet are very expressive. Her pale and frail body was actually ideal for highlighting the part of the story line where she fell ill from her heart condition after exhausting herself from dancing.

It was the mad scene that made me cry. Tears welled up so much that my vision was blurred. When Giselle lost her mind, it brought forth a universal theme of love’s betrayal, something that so many of us have experienced or witnessed. Zakharova’s acting in this scene was superb. I like how her feet—not just her face—so sensitively expressed her melancholy. She did not go into full-scale hysteria when interpreting this scene, like in some other versions I have seen. Her descend into death was a gradual loss of senses and increase of agony. This was what made her emotions so real, and what provoked that heart-wrenching cry from me.

Hallberg was beautiful and charming as he always is–his physical appearance just perfect for the role of the nobility Albrecht. His performance was impeccable.

The role of Giselle’s mother was rather weak, compared with the ABT (recorded) version I have seen, in which she played more of a controlling matriarch, chastising Giselle and trying all she could—with physical rigor—to separate the young couple who had just fallen in love.

The soloists and corps de ballet from La Scala gave a very disappointing performance. Their jumps were heavy and extension quite poor. Luckily in the first act they were peasants, so despite the poor techniques, it did not feel so jarring. It was in the second act that these flaws really showed. As willies, or ghosts of the forest, their pointe shoes were noisy, their landings were heavy, the port de bras not so graceful, and their formation dances sometimes felt like zombie dances. As a friend of mine said, the company had chosen its supplemental corps on this tour, probably because it did not take Hong Kong seriously. While Nicoletta Manni, who played Myrtha, Queen of the Willis, generally danced beautifully and did not make too many faults in her performance, a good number of her jumps just felt like big thumps on the floor. Her face was not stern enough as the evil queen of the ghosts, and I feel that a taller dancer would be more suitable for this role.

Svetlana Zakharova as Giselle

By contrast, the two stars’ performance in Act 2 was the highlight of the night. I “ate up” every movement, every phrase, every gesture and facial expression, at times hard, as my vision was blurred again by my tears. Zakharova was perfect for the role as a ghost thanks to her physique and her melancholic facial expressions. Hallberg’s expression of remorse and his powerful yet graceful jumps were a delight to watch. I feel a lot of stage chemistry between them in this act. The archetypal ideal of love that transcends all human faults, including betrayal and jealousy, was so vividly portrayed. It was all very emotionally touching, and utterly devastating that the two lovers could not consummate their love due to the circumstances in “real life.” This is the eternal tragedy of love, a recurring theme in countless artistic and literary works. It makes me question: Are we condemned in this human condition forever and ever?

Perhaps that “living-happily-ever-after” ending of fairy tales are just what it is–fairy tales. That eternal longing for unattainable love is perhaps what makes love as a concept so romantic and tragic at the same time.